Spring 2020

IDE 756 – Design of Online Courses

Grade A

Course Summary:

As a content-rich asynchronous and synchronous course, IDE 756 window explores, designs, and critiques online instruction and learning. Students are engaged through reviews of online instruction topics, designing purposive online instruction, developing competencies to plan, design, implement, and evaluate online instruction. Students’ engagement is embedded with activities that include participating in virtual class sessions, developing an Instructor/Learner Models, developing instructional strategies/resources, and working in a team to develop a storyboard for teaching an online course.

Personal Reflections:

My reflections on this course start with its organization and then crucial takeaways. While the course content, as I mentioned was content-rich, its organization was a practical priority for me as a model of designing an online course. Even as the content was concern with online teaching and learning competencies, planning, designing, and implementing online courses, yet its organization had to prove evidence to its expectations. Unwaveringly, the course delivered with a well-designed and accessible Learning Management System (e.g., Blackboard) interface. Weekly Modules with clear instructions, activities, readings, and assessments were all layout in organized and easily accessible locations. Content materials were provided through multimedia, while synchronous sessions were recorded and made available for students.

I felt no pressure opening the LMS to locate content materials and walking through the course. This is a course in which I was able just to emulate the organization into my study schedule habit, and it turns out to be very useful for me. I did set my weekly goals based on the weekly course modules. With the estimated time written on each activity, I set my estimated time spend on each module and follow through.

My takeaway then was that the online course design is not just developing an interface to upload content materials and have synchronous sessions with students. Instead, like any other learning environment, motivation, satisfaction, and engagement are prime factors that drive effective instruction. Therefore, I learned that course organization, which happens to be the first to notice for students’ interactions with the interface, could steer a phenomenon that influences that course’s learning.

Development in IDD&E:

This brings up my development in IDD&E and how this course genuinely prompts within me a better understanding of multimedia integration and its’ use by teachers in online instruction. Undeniably, the new reality of multimedia instruction as the growing demand for online learning for all learning institutions is becoming overreaching (Hartshorne et al., 2013). Thus, teachers are significant players charged with integrating those media with or without the adequate training needed. In many cases, the experts for designing online courses – instructional designers, is called upon to train teachers to engage in this new reality.

As an expert or one may suggest a developing expert, my development in IDD&E, as far as this course has impacted me, prompt me to think deeply about instructional strategies to be appropriately used with learning resources in a multimedia learning environment.

This learned knowledge was demonstrated collaboratively with a team member on the final class project. The final project demonstrated our design and development of an online course, wherein developing the appropriate instructional strategies and selecting the resources aligned in achieving our desired outcomes. The project, which was developed via a storyboard as a blueprint for implementation, took seriously how the learners’ background and available resources in the project’s context had a significant impact on implementation. The learners’ background or prior knowledge in the content was paramount, but more to that was their background and use of technology or multimedia, which was essential since it was designed as an online course. Learners and teachers had to know how to use or access and integrate respectively multimedia for an effective and responsive learning environment.

Up to this time in my study, more and more evidence keeps pointing to the importance of multimedia, one that I am curious to explore, especially its integration for instruction.

Reference:

Heafner, T., Hartshorne, R., & Petty, T. (2013, March). Reconciling the expectations of all participants during a remote student teaching experience. In Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3911-3913). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

Artifacts

GWhorway Definitions&Terms,Instructor & Learner ModelWhorwayG_ResourcesChart.docxGarmondyu,Patrick_team projectPatrickGarmondyu-TeamProjectCritque

EDU 655 – Edu Test & Measurements

Grade A-

Course Summary:

EDU 655 is a course designed to give students practical exposure to develop, design, implement, and analyze testing and measurement practices. The course practical exposure provided a fundamental knowledge base and competence in the area of statistics, examined the different types of definitions used in tests and measurement, presented various design criteria for effective testing and measurement practices, and guided the conceptualization and application of tests and measurement. These were taught through readings, weekly quizzes, reflections, classroom activities, teamwork, exams, and a final project.

Personal Reflections:

My reflection on this course starts with a description of the course as an activity-packed course. Activity-packed with learning activities and the content itself. My description of the activity-packed course does not suggest that instruction was not effective, or activity was overwhelming. I am simply referring to activity-packed from a critical perspective of being enough as an instructional designer through my reflection lens.

Robust weekly quizzes, weekly written reflections followed by weekly items construction were learning activities that enhanced content digestion. However, within a quarter of the semester, participating in those activities began exhausting. To the end, students voted to leverage some of those activities when given a choice to spend more time on the final project. Obviously, I was not the only one noticing the exhausted learning environment with lots of learning activities but my peers also through the voting opportunity.

As I mentioned, the content itself was rich and over enough to consume during the allocated instructional time, both synchronously and asynchronously. Besides the weekly readings from the textbook, which had an assessment that followed, a couple more required and optional readings were listed to consume asynchronously. Synchronous classroom activities and content presentation often did not get enough time before our daily session expired. You can imagine that there was much content to cover weekly, which was necessary, but due to limited instructional time, a lot more content was not covered. Evidence to that was the many days we left sessions, not covering the prepared presentation slides.

Development in IDD&E

Nevertheless, my growth in IDD&E began to take an intervention approach toward my research in multimedia integration. With the knowledge about items construction and items analysis, the thought about creating an assessment to assess teachers’ knowledge about multimedia integration was forthcoming.

My final project focused on creating an instrument that will be used to assess teacher knowledge about integrating audio-visual media into instruction using the voice principle, segmenting principle, redundancy principle, and modality principle of Myers’ Multimedia learning principles. As an individual lead project, I had to envision a designed, developed, and implemented training where my instrument could be appropriately applied to access the teachers’ knowledge according to the desired objectives. Thus I had to ensure that my 25 items instrument cover the training content and knowledge gap identified. Aligning my goals, objectives, instructional strategies, and resources were vital knowledge and skills I needed, which I had to construct better items in this psychometric course.

Though the course was not a required IDD&E course, overall, it developed my assessment knowledge and skills related to creating intervention to improve performance.

Artifacts

Group C Garmondyu & Lili- Post-test 3 Performance AssessmentGWhorway Instrument Construction Project ,   655 Agenda Structure

IDE 742 – Intro to Survey Research

Grade A-

Course Summary:

This core IDD&E course provided knowledge and skills in survey design, including sampling methods, data collection methods, and ethics of questionnaire and interview within survey design research. Students are introduced to the basic concepts and procedures for conducting survey research through step-by-step guidelines in sampling, data collection, data analysis, and reporting. Collaborative classroom activities and individual activities were learning activities employed to enhance students’ performance.

Personal Reflections:

This course taught me one of the best lessons so far about research in general. A lesson that I am grateful I gain because of the support of the faculty and my peers. A lesson that sprang from my sampling method while working on the final individual project. Here is the point, I had a study designed without a guarantee about my participants’ availability to participate in the study. Indeed, without that guarantee, as expected, participants were not available just in the middle of my study. It was frustrating, but it was a moment to learn as my peers and course faculty rally with me to complete the course. The lesson learned was that research design should be clearly thought through considering the support needed for execution.

Besides, the overall course was clearly layout; though the initial textbook did not appear to be up-to-date, the faculty quickly recommended other textbooks that were good enough to understand the content. Classroom lectures and notes were also a good source of knowledge during the course and were mostly focused on preparing students for the final project. Obviously, the classroom lectures and notes sync with the course objective which was to give students step-by-step guidelines experience and knowledge in survey research.

My takeaway then was that survey research gave a foundational understanding of planning and executing a research study for which this course provided such knowledge.

Development in IDD&E

The knowledge provided and that which I acquired was demonstrated in my continuous thinking about multimedia integration as I develop in the IDD&E field. I anticipated at the beginning of this course to actually work with teachers who are experiencing the use of multimedia in the classroom as part of my survey research individual project. However, as I mentioned, it did not go as -plan, so my peers and faculty substituted in filling up my questionnaire.

With my research thinking circumventing around multimedia, again multimedia began my focus for this class project. This time, I looked at teachers’ perceptions, especially with research suggesting that the availability of multimedia products (e.g., video) alone could not adequately support teachers’ perceptions about multimedia usefulness in their classrooms (Stirling, D. et al., 2004). Based on that, my final project sort of investigating multimedia (i.e., interactive and narrative media) used inside and outside the classroom and how that used influenced the teachers’ perceptions of multimedia usefulness. You will imagine then, as survey research study intervention was not the case for this research; instead, it was a survey or questionnaire as the nomenclature states.

Arguably, we could view my project in the lens of IDD&E from an evaluation standpoint. The research hoped to examine teachers’ feelings to help determine the necessary approach to increase performance, which can be the ultimate purpose for evaluation.

Reference:

Stirling, D., Williams, M. K., & Padgett, H. (2004). Investigating the effectiveness of video case use in teacher education. In Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2663-2668).

Artifacts

IDE742_Final Paper-merged with project artifacts  IDE742 Final project Presentation pdf

IDE 990 – Independent Study

Grade A

Course Summary:

A course designed as an advanced seminar to give students an understanding of how to conduct a literature review, thereby critiquing research and practice in the instructional design field. Students investigate emerging models, practices, theories, and research topics in instructional design and development, especially with the emergence of new models and technologies. Classroom activities designed in a forum format, include presentations of students’ understanding of the history of the instructional design field, design and development theories, and models as it relates to the community of instructional design practitioners, researchers, and scholars within each student’s research interest.

Personal Reflections:

With the course idea of giving students the instructional guide to the research paradigms within instructional design and a practical understanding of instructional development, it was clear that this course would be authentic. Authentic in the sense that unlike other courses, this course opens a window of lifetime exploration into ones’ research or practice.

Reviewing over a hundred peer-reviewed articles from more than four research journals, critiquing the trend of the research and history in the IDD&E field, and injecting one’s passion and interest along the way while finding an identity were hourly experience during this course. A practice that has become more like a habit as I think about how I should go about my research.

My research took shape based on the critique from peers and faculty during the forum. I had to go beyond my research exploring my peers’ research areas to support my peers but, most importantly, to identify the uniqueness of my research thoughts and how they could contribute to the literature or practice in the IDD&E field.

Development in IDD&E

In this course, the IDD&E project included teamwork on a final project and extensive research identifying “how I fit in” the instructional design field, especially with the trend.

The team project which my team picked from the projects presented was a practical instructional development work plan. My team task was to develop a comprehensive instructional design work plan based on the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (ADDIE) model as a framework. After patient feedbacks from peers and the faculty, our work plan in the form of a Gantt chart included major phases of the ADDIE model, containing deliverables, resources, and approximated timeline.

I had these takeaways moving forward for extensive research identifying my “fit-in” within the instructional design field.

  • To begin to narrow my research around multimedia learning related to its benefits, challenges, and already used interventions in multimedia teaching and learning. These are broader to some extent, but this course taught me to identify research gaps and explore my identity through what has been studied and what needs to be studied.
  • To identify the trend of multimedia in research and practice. Moving beyond that trend to understanding the contextual influence on those research and practice.

Artifacts

Course Reflection  Lei&Garmondyu_WorkPlan- Final project   Lei&Garmondyu final project summary  Importance of ID profession & ADDIE Significant ID historical events as it GWhorway’s research 

Journal review

American Journal of Distance Education

Educational Technology Research and Development

Instructional Science

TechTrends